Список трудов Гильберта Линга
The List of Ling's works

(в хронологическом порядке)

1. Gerard, R.W. and Ling, G.N. The membrane potential of single muscle fibers. Am.J.Physiol. 155:437, 1948.

2. Ling, G.N. Effect of stretch on membrane potential in frog muscle. Fed.Proc. 7:72, 1948.

3. Ling, G.N. and Woodbury, J.W. Effect of temperature on the membrane potential of frog sartorius muscle. Fed.Proc. 8:97, 1949.

4. Ling, G.N. and Woodbury, J.W. The effect of temperature on the membrane potential of frog muscle fibers. J.Cell.Comp.Physiol. 34:407-412, 1949.

5. Ling, G.N. and Gerard, R.W. The membrane potential and metabolism of muscle fibers. J.Cell.Comp.Physiol. 34(3):413-438, 1949.

6. Ling, G.N. and Gerard, R.W. Further studies on the single muscle fiber membrane potential. Fed.Proc. 8(1):97, 1949.

7. Ling, G.N. and Gerard, R.W. The influence of stretch on the membrane potential of the striated muscle fiber. J.Cell.Comp.Physiol. 34(3):397-405, 1949.

8. Ling, G.N. and Gerard, R.W. The normal membrane potential of frog sartorius fibers. J.Cell.Comp.Physiol. 34:383, 1949.

9. Ling, G.N. Effect of stretch on membrane potential in frog muscle. Fed.Proc. 8:72-73, 1949.

10. Ling, G.N. and Gerard, R.W. External potassium and membrane potential of single muscle fibers. Nature (London) 165:113-114, 1950.

11. Ling, G.N. Nature of muscle membrane potential. Fed. Proc. 9:78, 1950.

12. Ling, G.N. Biochemical composition of muscle. In: Handbook of Biological Data, edited by Spector WS, 1951,

13. Ling, G.N. Tentative hypothesis for selective ionic accumulation in muscle cells. Am.J.Physiol. 167:806, 1951.

14. Ling, G.N. Selective ionic accumulation in muscle cells. Fed.Proc. 11:95, 1952.

15. Ling, G.N. The role of phosphate in the maintenance of the resting potential and selective ionic accumulationin frog muscle cells. In: Phosphorous Metabolism, Vol.II, edited by McElroy WD and Glass B, Baltimore:The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1952, p. 748-795.

16. Ling, G.N. Fixed charge hypothesis for selective ionic accumulation. Fed.Proc. 12:88, 1953.

17. Ling, G.N. Ionic permeability according to the fixed charge hypothesis. In: Proc. 19th Intern. Physiol. Congress, Montreal, Canada: 1953, p. 566.

18. Ling, G.N. Cellular selective ionic accumulation and permeability. Am.J.Physiol. 170:656, 1954.

19. Ling, G.N. Fixed charge hypothesis for selective ionic accumulation. Fed.Proc. 13:90, 1954.

20. Ling, G.N. and Schmolinske, A. Am.J.Physiol. 179:656, 1954.

21. Ling, G.N. New hypothesis for the mechanism of cellular resting potential. Fed.Proc. 14:93, 1955.

22. Ling, G.N. Muscle electrolytes. Am.J.Phys.Med. 34:89-101, 1955.

23. Ling, G.N. and Schmolinske, A. Further evidence for the fixed charge hypothesis. Fed.Proc. 15:120, 1956.

24. Ling, G.N. Panel discussion on ionic transfer in muscle and nerve. In: Metabolic Aspects of Transport Across Cell Membranes, edited by Murphy QR, Madison, Wisconsin, 379 pp.University of Wisconsin Press, 1957, p. 181-186.

25. Ling, G.N. Fixed charge hypothesis for a key mechanism in change of Na-K permeability during excitation. Fed.Proc. 16:81, 1957.

26. Ling, G.N. Fixed charge induction hypothesis for biological transmitter, amplifier, and mixer at the molecular level. Fed.Proc. 17:98, 1958.

27. Ling, G.N. On the mechanism of cell potential. Fed.Proc. 18:371, 1959.

28. Ling, G.N. High K and low Na mobility in cells: Its interpretation in terms of the fixed charge-induction hypothesis. Fed.Proc. 19:8, 1960.

29. Ling, G.N. Membrane transport and metabolism. In: Symposium, Czechoslovakia Acad Sci. Discussion, New York:Academic Press, Inc, 1960, p. 314

30. Ling, G.N. The interpretation of selective ionic permeability and cellular potentials in terms of the fixed charge induction hypothesis. J.Gen.Physiol. 43(Suppl 5):149-174, 1960.

31. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. A crucial experiment in support of the fixed charge induction hypothesis. Fed.Proc. 20: 1961.

32. Ling, G.N. Discussion following paper of G.Eisenman. In: Symp Membrane Trans and Metab, Prague:Pub House of Chechoslovakia, 1961,

33. Ling, G.N. A Physical Theory of the Living State: The Association-Induction Hypothesis, Waltham, Massachusetts:Blaisdell, 1962. 680 p.

34. Ling, G.N. Membrane transport and metabolism. In: Symposium, Czechoslovakia Acad Sci. In: Discussion following paper of G.Eisenman, Prague:Publ House Czechoslovakia, 1963,

35. Ling, G.N. Association-induction hypothesis. Texas Rep.Biol.Med. 22:244-265, 1964.

36. Ling, G.N. The role of inductive effect in cooperative phenomena of proteins. Biopolymers Symposia 1(Suppl 1):91-116, 1964.

37. Ling, G.N. Role of inductive effect in cooperative phenomena of proteins. In: Biopolymer Symposium on Quantum Aspects of Polypeptides, 1964, p. 91-116.

38. Ling, G.N. The membrane theory and other views for solute permeability, distribution, and transport in living cells. Perspect.Biol.Med. 9(1):87-106, 1965.

39. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Studies on the ionic permeability of muscle cells and their models. Biophys.J. 5(6):777-807, 1965.

40. Ling, G.N. Thoughts on the molecular mechanism of the normal intestinal mucosa as a barrier to sodium ion movement and massive fluid loss in cholera. In: Proceedings of Cholera Research Symposium, Public Health Service (USA), Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1965, p. 103-106.

41. Ling, G.N. Insulin action on glucose uptake in muscle. Fed.Proc. 24:576, 1965.

42. Ling, G.N. The physical state of water in living cell and model systems. Ann.N.Y.Acad.Sci. 125(2):401-417, 1965.

43. Ling, G.N. Physiology and anatomy of the cell membrane: the physical state of water in the living cell. Fed.Proc. 24(Suppl 15):5103-5112, 1965.

44. Ling, G.N. Elektrische Potentiale lebender Zellen. In: Die Zelle: Structur und Funktion, M.B.H. Stuttgart, W.Germany:Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesselschaft, 1966,

45. Ling, G.N. Cell membrane and cell permeability. Ann.N.Y.Acad.Sci. 137(2):837-859, 1966.

46. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Studies on ion accumulation in muscle cells. J.Gen.Physiol. 49(4):819-843, 1966.

47. Ling, G.N. All-or-none adsorption by living cells and model protein-water systems: discussion of the problem of "permease-induction" and determination of secondary and tertiary structures of proteins. Fed.Proc. 25(3):958-970, 1966.

48. Ling, G.N. Elektrische Potentiale lebender Zellen. Naturw.Rundschau 20:415-426, 1967.

49. Ling, G.N. Anion-specific and cation-specific properties of the collodion-coated glass electrode and a modofication. In: Glass Electrodes for Hydrogen and Other Cations, edited by Eisenman G, New York:Marcel Dekker, Inc, 1967, p. 284-292.

50. Ling, G.N. and Kromash, M.H. The extracellular space of voluntary muscle tissues. J.Gen.Physiol. 50(3):677-694, 1967.

51. Ling, G.N. Effects of temperature on the state of water in the living cell. In: Thermobiology, edited by Rose A, New York:Academic Press, 1967, p. 5-24.

52. Ling, G.N., Ochsenfeld, M.M., and Karreman, G.A. Is the cell membrane a universal rate-limiting barrier to the movement of water between the living cell and its surrounding medium? J.Gen.Physiol. 50(6,Pt 1):1807-1820, 1967.

53. Neville, M.C. and Ling, G.N. Synergistic activation of beta-galactosidase by Na+ and Cs+. Arch.Biochem.Biophys. 118:596-610, 1967.

54. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. In vitro demonstration of Na+ ion exclusion from water in actomyosin gel. Fed.Proc. 27:702, 1968.

55. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Proc.Intern.Physiol.Congr.Washington,D.C. 24:266, 1968.

56. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Proc.Intern.Union.Physiol.Sci. 7:266, 1968.

57. Ling, G.N. The physical state of water in biological systems. Food Technology 22(10):1254ff-1259ff 31R, 1968.

58. Ling, G.N. and Cope, F.W. Potassium ion: Is the bulk of intracellular K+ adsorbed? Science 163:1335-1336, 1969.

59. Ling, G.N. Measurements of potassium ion activity in the cytoplasm of living cells. Nature (London) 221(5178):386-387, 1969.

60. Ling, G.N. The cell - A puddle or an Ice Cube? Scientific Research 1:35-39, 1969.

61. Ling, G.N. A new model for the living cell: A summary of the theory and recent experimental evidence in its support. Int'l Review of Cytology 26:1-61, 1969.

62. Ling, G.N. and Bohr, G. Studies on ionic distribution in living cells. I. Long-term preservation of isolated frog muscles. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 1:591-599, 1969.

63. Ling, G.N., Neville, M.C., Shannon, P., and Will, S. Studies on insulin action. I. The steady level of glucose accumulation in insulin-treated frog muscle at 0o C. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 1(1):42-67, 1969.

64. Ling, G.N. and Will, S. Studies on insulin action. III. Linear distribution of D-glucose, D-ribose and methanol in frog muscle cells at 0o C in the absence of insulin. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 1:263-279, 1969.

65. Ling, G.N., Neville, M.C., Will, S., and Shannon, P. Studies on insulin action. II. The extracellular space of frog muscle: demonstration of d-mannitol and sucrose entry into isolated single muscle fibers and intact muscles. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 1:85-99, 1969.

66. Ling, G.N., Will, S., and Shannon, P. Studies on insulin action. IV. Cooperative transition in adsortion: a theoretical interpretation of the priming action of glucose treatment at 25o C on the subsequent accumulation of labeled glucose by insulinized frog muscle at 0o C with a discussion of bacterial permease induction. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 1:355-367, 1969.

67. Ling, G.N. A new model for the living cell: a summary of the theory and recent experimental evidence in its support. Int.Rev.Cytol. 26:1-61, 1969.

68. Ling, G.N. Diphosphoglycerate and inosine hexaphosphate control of oxygen binding by hemoglobin: A theoretical interpretation of experimental data. Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A. 67(1):296-301, 1970.

69. Ling, G.N. The physical state of water in living cell. In: Dr. Gerard's Festschrift, edited by Grenell RG, New York:Gordon & Breach, 1970.

70. Ling, G.N. and Bohr, G. Studies on ion distribution in living cells. II. Cooperative interaction between intracellular potassium and sodium ions. Biophys.J. 10(6):519-538, 1970.

71. Ling, G.N. and Negendank, W. The physical state of water in frog muscles. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 2:15-33, 1970.

72. Ling, G.N. The physical state of water in living cells and its physiological significance. Int'l J Neuroscience 1:129-152, 1970.

73. Ling, G.N. The physical state of water in living cells and its physiological significance. Int.J.Neurosci. 1(2):129-152, 1970.

74. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Demostration of saturability and competition in ion transport into a membraneless protein-water system. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 2:189-194, 1970.

75. Ling, G.N. and Ferguson, E. Studies on ion permeability. II. Does exchange diffusion make a significant contribution to the Na+-ion efflux in frog muscles? Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 2:516-522, 1970.

76. Ling, G.N. Studies on ion permeability. I. What determines the rate of Na ion efflux from frog muscle cells? Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 2:242-248, 1970.

77. Ling, G.N. and Bohr, G. Studies on ion distribution in living cells. II. Cooperative interaction between intracellular K+ and Na+ ions. Biophys.J. 10(6):519-538, 1970.

78. Miller, C. and Ling, G.N. Structural change of intracellular water in caffeine-contracted muscle cells. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 2:495-498, 1970.

79. Gulati, J., Ochsenfeld, M.M., and Ling, G.N. Metabolic cooperative control of electrolyte levels by adenosine triphosphate in the frog muscle. Biophys.J. 11(12):973-980, 1971.

80. Ling, G.N. and Bohr, G. Studies on ion distribution in living cells. III. Cooperative control of electrolyte accumulation by ouabain in the frog muscle. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 3:431-447, 1971.

81. Ling, G.N. Elektrische Potentiale lebender Zellen. In: Die Zelle: Structure und Funktion, edited by Metzner H,Stuttgart, W Germany:Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft Stuttgart, 1971, p. 314

82. Ling, G.N. The physico-chemical nature of the living cell according to the association-induction hypothesis. In: First Europians Biophysics Cogress, edited by Broda E, Locker A, and Springer-Lederer H,Verlag der Wiener Medizinischen Akademie, 1971,

83. Ling, G.N. and Bohr, G. Studies of ionic distribution in living cells. IV. Effect of ouabain on the equilibrium concentrations of Cs+, Rb+, K+, Na+, and Li+ ions in frog muscle cells. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 3:573-583, 1971.

84. Reisin, I.L., Gulati, J., and Ling, G.N. Critical cooperative transition of electrolyte accumulation with temperature in guinea pig taenia-coli and Ehrich ascitic tumor cells. Fed.Proc. 30(2):A313, 1971.

85. Ling, G.N. Water structure at the water-polymer interface. In: Water Structure at the Water-Polymer Interface, edited by Jellinek H.H.G., New York:Plenum Press, 1972, p. 4-13.

86. Ling, G.N. Hydration of macromolecules. In: Water and Aqueous Solutions: Structure, Thermodynamics and Transport Processes, edited by Horne R.A., New York:Wiley-Interscience, 1972, p. 663-700.

87. Ling, G.N. Cell theory that holds water. Medical World News April 2:56E-56G, 1972.

88. Ling, G.N. and Palmer, L.G. Studies on ion permeability. IV. The mechanism of ouabain action on the Na+-ion efflux in frog muscles. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 4(6):517-525, 1972.

89. Ling, G.N. Studies on ion permeability. III. Diffusion of Br- ion in the extracellular space of frog muscle. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 4(3):199-208, 1972.

90. Ling, G.N. The physicochemical nature of the living cell. In: Reversibility of Cellular Enjury Due to Inadequate Perfusion, edited by Malinen TP, Zeppa R, Gollan F, and Callaghan AB,Springfield, Ill:C.C.Thomas, 1972, p. 12-21.

91. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Is the intracellular K+ in free state? A study of diffusion in the exposed cytoplasm of muscle cells. Science 181:78, 1973.

92. Ling, G.N. What component of the living cell is responsible for its semipermeable properties? Polarized water or lipids? Biophys.J. 13:807-816, 1973.

93. Ling, G.N. How does ouabain control the levels of K+ and Na+? By interference with a Na pump or by allosteric control of K+-Na+ adsorption on cytoplasmic protein sites? Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 5(4):295-311, 1973.

94. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Mobility of potassium ion in frog muscle cells, both living and dead. Science 181(4094):78-81, 1973.

95. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Control of cooperative adsorption of solutes and water in living cells by hormones, drugs, and metabolic products. Ann.N.Y.Acad.Sci. 204:325-336, 1973.

96. Ling, G.N., Miller, C., and Ochsenfeld, M.M. The physical state of solutes and water in living cells accoding to the association-induction hypothesis. Ann.N.Y.Acad.Sci. 204:6-50, 1973.

97. Reisin, I.L. and Ling, G.N. Exchange of 3HHO in intact isolated muscle fiber of the giant barnacle. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 5(3):183-208, 1973.

98. Ling, G.N. Physico-chemical principles regulating cellular water and electrolyte exchange. In: Acute Fluid Replacement in the Therapy of Shock, edited by Malinen TI, Zeppa, R., Drucker, W.R., and Callaghan, A.B., New York:Stratton-Intercontinental Medical Book Corp. 1974, p. 157

99. Ling, G.N. An answer to a reported apparent contradiction in the predicted relation between the concentration of ATP and K in living cells. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 6(3):285-286, 1974.

100. Ling, G.N. The mechanism of cellular resting potential according to the association-induction hypothesis and the perfused squid axon: Correcting a misrepresentation. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 7(1):91-93, 1975.

101. Ling, G.N. and Balter, M. Red blood cell ghost: Hollow membranes or solid bodies? Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 7(6):529-531, 1975.

102. Ling, G.N. and Walton, C.L. A simple rapid method for the quantitative separation of the extracellular fluid in frog muslces. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 7(3):215-218, 1975.

103. Ling, G.N. and Walton, C.L. Simultaneous efflux of potassium and sodium from frog sartorious muscle freed of extracellular fluids: Evidence for rapidly exchanging Na+ from the cells. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 7(6):501-515, 1975.

104. Ling, G.N. and Sobel, A.M. The mechanism for the exclusion of sugars from the water in a model of the living cell: the ion-exchange resin: pore size or water structure? Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 7(5):415-421, 1975.

105. Ling, G.N. Letter to Science. Science 193:530-531, 1976.

106. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Na+ and K+ levels in living cells: Do they depend on the rate of outward transport of Na+? Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 8(5):389-395, 1976.

107. Ling, G.N. and Walton, C.L. What retains water in living cells? Science 191:293-295, 1976.

108. Ling, G.N. and Will, S. Studies on insulin action. V. Structural requirements of primers for subsequent accumulation of d-glucose at 0o C in insulinized frog muscles. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 8(2):115-124, 1976.

109. Ling, G.N., Walton, C.L., and Bersinger, T.J. Experimantal confirmation of the theory of long range ordering of water molecules in polarized multilayers by the extended NHCO sites of the extended protein backbone and the functional capability of this water to exclude sodium and other solutes. The Physiologist 19(3): 1976.

110. Ling, G.N. Thallium and cesium in muscle cells compete for the adsorption sites normally occupied by K+. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 9(3):217-225, 1977.

111. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Confirmation of "universality rule" in solute distributions: Studies of simultaneous efflux of Na+ and D-arabinose from single frog eggs living, dying, and dead. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 9(4-5):405-426, 1977.

112. Ling, G.N. Potassium accumulation in frog muscle: The association-induction hypothesis versus the membrane theory. Science 198:1281-1283, 1977.

113. Ling, G.N. The physical state of water and ions in living cells and a new theory of the energization of biological work performance by ATP. Mol.Cell Biochem. 15(3):159-172, 1977.

114. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Experimental verification of an expected relation between time of incubation and magnitude of the fast and slow fractions of the sodium efflux from amphibian eggs. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 9(4-5):427-431, 1977.

115. Ling, G.N. The functions of polarized water and membrane lipids: a rebuttal. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 9(4-5):301-311, 1977.

116. Ling, G.N. and Peterson, K. A theory of cell swelling in high concentrations of KCL and other chloride salts. Bull.Math.Biol. 39(6):721-741, 1977.

117. Ling, G.N. K+ localization in muscle cells by autoradiography, and identification of K+ adsorbing sites in living muscle cells with uranium binding sites in electron micrographs of fixed cell preparations. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 9(4-5):319-327, 1977.

118. Ling, G.N. Two opposing theories of the cellular electrical potential: A quarter of a century of experimental testing. Bioelectrochemistry and Bioenergetics 5:411-419, 1978.

119. Ling, G.N., Ochsenfeld, M.M., Walton, C.L., and Bersinger, T.J. Experimental confirmation, from model studies, of a key prediction of the polarized multilayer theory of cell water. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 10(1):87-88, 1978.

120. Ling, G.N. Maintenance of low sodium and high potassium levels in resting muscle cells. J.Physiol.(Lond) 280:105-23:105-123, 1978.

121. Ling, G.N. Experimental confirmation of a key prediction of the polarized multilayer theory of cell water from model studies. In: Sixth Intern Biophys Cong, Kioto, Japan, Sept 3-9, 1978, 1978, p. 389

122. Ling, G.N. How does reduced external K+ concentration affect the rate of Na+ efflux? Evidence against the K-Na coupled pump but in support of the association-induction hypothesis. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 10(4):353-365, 1978.

123. Ling, G.N. Peer review and the progress of scientific research. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 10(1):95-96, 1978.

124. Ling, G.N. Maintenance of low sodium and high potassium levels in resting muscle cells. J.Physiol. 280:105-123, 1978.

125. Ling, G.N. The equations for cellular resting potentials according to the surface adsorption theory, A corollary of the association-induction hypothesis. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 11:59-64, 1979.

126. Ling, G.N. Ion and water transport: Experimental design defended. Trends in Biochem.Sci. 4(6):N134-N135, 1979.

127. Ling, G.N., Walton, C., and Ling, M.R. Mg++ and K+ distribution in frog muscle and egg: a disproof of the Donnan theory of membrane equilibrium applied to the living cells. J.Cell Physiol. 101(2):261-278, 1979.

128. Ling, G.N. The polarized multilayer theory of cell water and other facets of the association-induction hypothesis concerning the distribution of ions and other solutes in living cells. In: The Aqueous Cytoplasm, edited by Keith, A.D., New York:Marcell Dekker, Inc, 1979, p. 23-60.

129. Ling, G.N. The polarized multilayer theory of cell water accoding to the association-induction hypothesis. In: Cell-Associated Water, edited by Drost-Hansen, W. and Clegg, J.S., New York:Academic Press, 1979, p. 261-270.

130. Ling, G.N. The theory of the allosteric control of cooperative adsorption and conformation changes: A molecular model for physiological activities according to the association-induction hypothesis. In: Cooperative Phenomenon in Biology, edited by Karreman, G., New York:Pergamon Press, 1980, p. 39-69.

131. Ling, G.N. and Tucker, M. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and water contents in normal mouse and rat tissues and in cancer cells. J.Natl.Cancer Inst. 64(5):1199-1207, 1980.

132. Ling, G.N. The role of multilayer polarization of cell water in the swelling and shrinkage of living cells. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 12(4):383-384, 1980.

133. Ling, G.N. and Negendank, W. Do isolated membranes and purified vesicles pump sodium? A critical review and reinterpretation. Perspect.Biol.Med. 23(2 PT1):215-239, 1980.

134. Ling, G.N., Ochsenfeld, M.M., Walton, C.L., and Bersinger, T.J. Reduced solubility of polymer-oriented water for sodium salts, sugars, amino acids, and other solutes normally maintained at low levels in living cells. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 12(2):111-138, 1980.

135. Ling, G.N., Ochsenfeld, M.M., Walton, C.L., and Bersinger, T.J. Mechanism of solute exclusion from cells: The role of protein-water interaction. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 12:3-10, 1980.

136. Ling, G.N., Walton, C.L., and Bersinger, T.J. Properties of polymer-oriented water to exclude Na+, sugar, amino acides and other solutes normally excluded from living cells. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 12:111, 1980.

137. Ling, G.N. Underestimation of Na permeability in muscle cells: Implications for the theory of cell potential and for energy requirement of the Na pump. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 12(3):215-232, 1980.

138. Ling, G.N. Active solute transport across frog skin and epithelial cell systems according to the association-induction hypothesis. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 13(4):356-382, 1981.

139. Ling, G.N. Oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial physiology: A critical review of chemiosmotic theory, and reinterpretation by the association-induction hypothesis. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 13(1):29-96, 1981.

140. Ling, G.N. Water and the living cell as seen from the viewpoint of a new paradigm. In: International Cell Biology, 1980-1981, edited by Schweiger, H.G., Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 1033 pp. Springer Verlag, 1981, p. 904-914.

141. Ling, G.N., Walton, C.L., and Ochsenfeld, M.M. A unitary cause for the exclusion of Na+ and other solutes from living cells, suggested by effluxes of Na+, d-arabinose, and sucrose from normal, dying, and dead muscles. J.Cell Physiol. 106(3):385-398, 1981.

142. Ling, G.N. Synchronous control of metabolic activity by K+ transiently and reversibly liberated from adsorption sites during muscle contraction: An extension of association-induction theory. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 13(6):565-566, 1981.

143. Ling, G.N. and Murphy, R.C. Apparent similarity in protein compositions of maximally deviated cancer cells. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 14(3):213, 1982.

144. Ling, G.N. and Murphy, R.C. NMR relaxation of water protons under the influence of proteins and other linear polymers. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 14(3):209-211, 1982.

145. Ling, G.N. The cellular resting and action potentials: Interpretation based on the association-induction hypothesis. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 14(1):47-96, 1982.

146. Ling, G.N. and Murphy, R.C. Preliminary note apparent similarity in protein compositions of maximally deviated cancer cells. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 14:213, 1982.

147. Ling, G.N. The association-induction hypothesis. A theoretical foundation provided for the possible beneficial effects of a low Na, high K diet and other similar regimens in the treatment of patients suffering from debilitating illnesses. Agressologie. 24(7):293-302, 1983.

148. Ling, G.N. and Zhang, Z.L. Evidence that Na+ in a sulfonate ion exchange resin exists in an adsorbed state. Its significance for the interpretation of NMR data in resins and cells. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 15(3):251-258, 1983.

149. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Studies on the physical state of water in living cells and model systems. I. The quantitative relationship between the concentration of gelatin and certain oxygen-containing polymers and their influence upon the solubility of water for NA+ salts. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 15(2):127-136, 1983.

150. Ling, G.N. and Kwon, Y. Cold injury-induced swelling of brain and other tissues: its molecular mechanism. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 15(3):239-250, 1983.

151. Ling, G.N. Evidence for a significant role of paramegnetic ions in the observed NMR relaxation rates of living tissues. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 15(6):505-510, 1983.

152. Ling, G.N. and Fisher, A. Cooperative interaction among cell surface sites: evidence in support of the surface adsorption theory of cellular electrical potentials. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 15(5):369-378, 1983.

153. Ling, G.N. Studies on the physical state of water in living cells and model systems. III. The high osmotic activities of aqueous solutions of gelatin, polyvinylpyrrolidone and poly(ethylene oxide) and their relation to the reduced solubility for Na+, sugars, and free amino acids. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 15(2):155-165, 1983.

154. Ling, G.N. The molecular mechanisms of cellular potentials. In: Structure and Function in Excitable Cells, edited by Chang, D.C., Tasaki, I., Adelman, W.J., and Leuchtag, H.R., New York and London:Plenum Press, 1983, p. 365-382.

155. Ling, G.N., Walton, C.L., and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Indifference of the resting potential of frog muscle cells to external Mg++ in the face of high Mg++ permeability. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 15(5):379-390, 1983.

156. Ling, G.N. and Murphy, R.C. Studies on the physical state of water in living cells and model systems. II. NMR relaxation times of water protons in aqueous solutions of gelatin and oxygen-containing polymers which reduce the solvency of water for Na+, sugars, and free amino acids. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 15(2):137-154, 1983.

157. Ling, G.N. and Tucker, M. Only solid red blood cell ghosts transport K+ and Na+ against concentration gradients. Hollow intact ghosts with K+-Na+ activated ATPase do not. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 15(4):311-317, 1983.

158. Ling, G.N. and Zhang, Z.L. Studies on the physical state of water in living cells and model systems. IV. Freezing and thawing point depression of water by gelatin, oxygen-containing polymers and urea-denatured proteins. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 15(5):391-406, 1983.

159. Ling, G.N. NMR relaxation times of water protons in normal tissues and cancer cells: The role of paramagnetic ions. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 15(6):511-513, 1983.

160. Zhang, Z.L. and Ling, G.N. Studies on the physical state of water in living cells and model systems. V. The warming exothermic reaction of frozen aqueous solution of polyvinylpyrrolidone, poly(ethylene oxide), and urea-denatured proteins. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 15(5):407-415, 1983.

161. Ling, G.N. The electron-donating strengths of side chains in the determination of protein structure. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 16(5):459-460, 1984.

162. Ling, G.N. In Search of the Physical Basis of Life, New York and London:Plenum Press, 1984.-791.

163. Ling, G.N., Baxter, J.D., and Leitman, M.I. Effects of adrenaline, calcium, and ouabain on the resting potential of frog muscle: interpretation based on the theory of allosteric control of cooperative interactions among surface anionic sites. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 16(5):405-423, 1984.

164. Ling, G.N., Zodda, D., and Sellers, M. Quantitative relationships between the concentration of proteins and the concentration of K+ and Na+ in red cell ghosts. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 16(5):381-392, 1984.

165. Ling, G.N. and Zhang, Z.L. A study of selective adsorption of Na+ and other alkali-metal ions on isolated proteins: a test of the salt-linkage hypothesis. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 16(3):221-235, 1984.

166. Ling, G.N. Warming-induced hyperpolarization of cardiac muscle cells and snail neurones: interpretation based on temperature transition of cooperatively linked surface anionic sites between K+ and Na+ adsorbing states. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 16(5):425-435, 1984.

167. Ling, G.N. Counterarguments against alleged proof of the Na-K pump in studies of K+ and Na+ distributions in amphibian eggs. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 16(4):293-305, 1984.

168. Ling, G.N. A new theory of the water contents of living cells in solutions containing different concentrations of permeant solutes. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 18(2):131, 1986.

169. Ling, G.N., Reid, C., and Murphy, R.C. Are the proteins in malignant cancer cells of diverse origin similar or different? Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 18(3):147-158, 1986.

170. Ling, G.N. Cooperative interaction among surface beta- and gamma-carboxyl groups mediating the permeation of ions into frog muscle cells. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 18(2):125-129, 1986.

171. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Membrane lipid layers vs. polarized water dominated by fixed ions: a comparative study of the effects of three macrocyclic ionophores on the K+ permeability of frog skeletal muscle, frog ovarian eggs, and human erythrocytes. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 18(2):109-124, 1986.

172. Ling, G.N. The role of inductive effect in the determination of protein structure. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 18(1):3-16, 1986.

173. Ling, G.N. and Fu, Y.Z. An electronic mechanism in the actions of drugs and other cardinal adsorbents. I. Effects of ouabain on the relative affinities of the cell surface beta- and gamma-carboxyl groups for K+, Na+, glycine and other ions. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 19(3):209-220, 1987.

174. Ling, G.N. Cell volumes and water contents of frog muscles in solutions of permeant sugars and sugar alcohols. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 19(3):159-175, 1987.

175. Ling, G.N. and Hu, W.X. Studies on the physical state of water in living cells and model systems. VIII. Water vapor sorption on proteins and oxygen-containing polymers at physiological vapor pressures: presenting a new method for the study of vapor sorption at close to and including saturation. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 19(4):251-269, 1987.

176. Ling, G.N. On the large error introduced in the estimate of the density of membrane pores from permeability measurements when diffusion in "unstirred layer" within the cells is disregarded. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 19(3):199-207, 1987.

177. Ling, G.N. Studies on the physical state of water in living cells and model systems. VII. Exclusion of sugars and sugar alcohols from the water in sulfonate ion exchange resins: the "size rule". Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 19(3):193-198, 1987.

178. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Studies on the physical state of water in living cells and model systems. VI. Concentration-dependent sustained volume changes of dialysis sacs containing aqueous solution of native and denatured protein, gelatin, and oxygen-containing polymers immersed in solutions of Na salt and of sugar and sugar alcohol. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 19(3):177-192, 1987.

179. Ling, G.N. Studies on the physical state of water in living cells and model systems: IX. Theoretical significance of a straight line relationship between intracellular concentration of a partially excluded solute and its concentration in the bathing medium. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 20(4):281-292, 1988.

180. Ling, G.N. A physical theory of the living state: application to water and solute distribution. Scanning Microsc. 2(2):899-913, 1988.

181. Ling, G.N. Solute exclusion by polymer and protein-dominated water: correlation with results of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and calorimetric studies and their significance for the understanding of the physical state of water in living cells. Scanning Microsc. 2(2):871-884, 1988.

182. Ling, G.N. and Fu, Y.Z. An electronic mechanism in the action of drugs, ATP, transmitters and other cardinal adsorbents. II. Effect of ouabain on the relative affinities for Li+, Na+, K+, and Rb+ of surface anionic sites that mediate the entry of Cs+ into frog ovarian eggs. Physiol. Chem. Phys. Med. NMR. 20(1):61-77, 1988.

183. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. Studies on the physical state of water in living cells and model systems. XI. The equilibrium distribution coefficients of pentoses in muscle cell water: their dependence primarily on the molecular weights of the pentoses and lesser dependence on their stereospecificity. Physiol. Chem. Phys. Med. NMR. 20(4):309-317, 1988.

184. Ling, G.N. and Hu, W. Studies on the physical state of water in living cells and model systems. X. The dependence of the equilibrium distribution coefficient of a solute in polarized water on the molecular weights of the solute: experimental confirmation of the "size rule" in model studies. Physiol. Chem. Phys. Med. NMR. 20(4):293-307, 1988.

185. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. The physical state of water in living cells and model systems. XII. The influence of the conformation of a protein on the solubility of Na+ (sulfate), sucrose, glycine and urea in the water in which the protein is also dissolved. Physiol. Chem. Phys. Med. NMR. 21(1):19-44, 1989.

186. Ling, G.N. Further studies on the role of paramagnetic ion contents on the NMR relaxation time, T1 of normal tissues and cancer cells. Physiol. Chem. Phys. Med. NMR. 21(1):15-18, 1989.

187. Ling, G.N. Partial preservation of the ability of accumulating alkali-metal ions in 2 mm muscle cell segments with both ends open. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 21(1):13-14, 1989.

188. Ling, G.N. Theory of active transport across frog skin and other bifacial cell systems. A subsidiary of the association-induction hypothesis. Scanning Microsc. 4(3):723-729; discus. 729-736, 1990.

189. Ling, G.N. The physical state of potassium ion in the living cell. Scanning Microsc. 4(3):737-750; discus. 750-756, 1990.

190. Ling, G.N., Kolebic, T., and Damadian, R. Low paramagnetic-ion content in cancer cells: its significance in cancer detection by magnetic resonance imaging. Physiol. Chem. Phys. Med. NMR. 22(1):1-14, 1990.

191. Ling, G.N. and Ochsenfeld, M.M. The majority of potassium ions in muscle cells is adsorbed on beta- and gamma-carboxyl groups of myosin: potassium-ion-adsorbing carboxyl groups on myosin heads engage in cross-bridge formation during contraction. Physiol. Chem. Phys. Med. NMR. 23(3):133-160, 1991.

192. Ling, G.N. A Revolution in the Physiology of the Living Cell, Malabar, Florida:Krieger Publishing Company, 1992. 404 p.

193. Ling, G.N. Can we see living structure in a cell? Scanning Microsc. 6(2):405-39; discussion 439-5, 1992.

194. Ling, G.N., Niu, Z., and Ochsenfeld, M. Predictions of polarized multilayer theory of solute distribution confirmed from a study of the equilibrium distribution in frog muscle of twenty-one nonelectrolytes including five cryoprotectants. Physiol. Chem. Phys. Med. NMR. 25(3):177-208, 1993.

195. Ling, G.N. A quantitative theory of solute distribution in cell water according to molecular size. Physiol. Chem. Phys. Med. NMR. 25(3):145-175, 1993.

196. Ling, G.N. The new cell physiology: an outline, presented against its full historical background, beginning from the beginning. Physiol. Chem. Phys. Med. NMR. 26(2):121-203, 1994.

197. Ling, G.N. Debunking the alleged resurrection of the sodium pump hypothesis. Physiol.Chem.Phys.Med.NMR. 29(2):123-198, 1997.

198. Ling, G.N. Explaining on request a correlation between membrane Na,K-ATPase and K+ content in erythrocytes and other findings in the preceding paper. Physiol. Chem. Phys. Med. NMR. 30(1):89-97, 1998.

199. Ling, G.N. A New Theoretical Foundation for the Polarized-Oriented Multilayer Theory of Cell Water and for Inanimate Systems Demonstrating Long-range Dynamic Structuring of Water Molecules. Physiol. Chem. Phys. Med. NMR. 35(2):91-130, 2003.

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